Source: News Bharati English22 Dec 2016 10:53:57

Jiuquan, December 22: China on Thursday early morning successfully launched carbon dioxide monitoring satellite via a Long March-2D rocket from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China's Gobi Desert at 3:22 a.m. Like to tell you that, China is the third country after Japan and the United States to monitor global carbon emissions or greenhouse gases through its own satellite. The satellite TanSat will provide China's policymakers with independent data for three years.
The launch follows the United States joining China in formally ratifying the Paris agreement to curb climate-warming emissions. It also comes as large sections of northern China have been shrouded in near-record levels of air pollution for most of the past week, disrupting flights, closing factories and schools, and forcing authorities to issue red alerts.

The 620 kg (1,370 lbs) satellite TanSat was sent into a sun synchronous orbit about 700 km (435 miles) above the earth and will monitor the concentration, distribution and flow of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, said Yin Zengshan, chief designer of TanSat at the Chinese Academy of Sciences micro-satellite research institute. TanSat will take readings of global carbon dioxide every 16 days, accurate to at least 4 parts per million.

This was the 243rd mission of the Long March series rockets. Besides TanSat, the rocket also carried a high-resolution micro-nano satellite and two spectrum micro-nano satellites for agricultural and forestry monitoring.

About the satellite Lu Naimeng, TanSat chief scientist said concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has increased from 280 ppm to 400 ppm over the past 150 years, leading to an increase in average global temperatures of about 0.7 degrees Celsius over the last century. Interestingly, China’s carbon dioxide emissions are to peak around 2030, with emissions per unit of GDP cut by 60 percent of 2005 levels by the same date.