Source: News Bharati English01 Feb 2017 11:30:49

Mumbai, February 1: The festival filled up with rainbow colors, creativity and ethnicity of ideologies is set to invite you on the streets of Mumbai. Yes you guessed it right, Its Kala Ghoda Festival which is ready to greet you from 4th February to 12 February. It’s the platform where artists and performers from across the country showcase their creative talent.

Best is yet to come. The food stalls, music, dance, theatre shows, heritage walks, workshops and handicraft stalls are the heart of the festival. This year’s theme for dance is ‘the power of rhythm and the speed of the music’. “This is to mark the return of a Kala Ghoda statue in the area, and rhythm of course is the basis of all dances,” says section curator Anonna Guha.

There are authors coming in from around the world, including Switzerland, Israel and Germany, says section co-curator Asad Lalljee. “Our aim has been to put together a line-up that would engage as many people as possible,” Lalljee adds. “For instance, we have Padma Lakshmi talking about her latest book, the moving memoir titled Love, Loss and What We Ate.”

Kala Ghoda Festival is the country’s largest multi-cultural festival which celebrates the heritage of South Mumbai. The festival witnesses different groups of people right from families to students. This is one of the highlighted festivals which draws high amount of crowd from across the country. The festival inculcates art and cultural installations, exhibition of funky collections and antiques, paintings, crafts etc. The workshops are too fun part of the festival as they cater to informative and fun with creative topics. Right from about our culture, how spices how shaped the tradition and history etc are the attractions.

The children’s literature section, meanwhile, will include interactive sessions on subjects ranging from healthy eating and the importance of protecting the environment, to magic and illusions with mentalist Neel Madhav, author of You Got Magic. “We’re aiming to discuss very important issues with the children, but in a fun and relatable manner,” says section curator Lubaina Bandukwala.

More than 700 dancers from across India and beyond, including countries such as France and Spain, will perform. There is plenty to look forward to for music lovers, too. Flute symphonies typically feature 25 to 100 performers; this one will have 75 flautists performing together, led by Vivek Sonar. “I am excited about performing at the same festival where I shared stage with my guru, the maestro Hariprasad Chaurasia 12 years ago,” said Sonar.