Source: News Bharati English17 Apr 2017 16:55:03

When you get plastered or band aid and doctors advise you to leave it for a week! Do you wonder how the wound gets healed? What happens under the band aid? Swansea University from UK soon to bring the smart 3D-printed bandages that will use 5G wireless data and nano-sized sensors to constantly relay details about your health.
5G wireless data and nano-sized sensors will offer "resilient, robust bandwidth" that sends a constant flow of data to doctors, said one of the researchers from the University, Marc Clement. This would also help physicians customize treatment based on the progress of your wound, your location, and your activity. If you're healing well and are staying active, for example, you may get a different solution than someone who's recovering slowly and needs to stay home.

"That intelligent dressing uses nano-technology to sense the state of that wound at any one specific time. It would connect that wound to a 5G infrastructure and that infrastructure through your telephone will also know things about you - where you are, how active you are at any one time. You combine all of that intelligence so the clinician knows the performance of the specific wound at any specific time and can then tailor the treatment protocol to the individual and wound in question."-Marc Clement, professor, chairman of the Institute of Life Science (ILS)

Trials of sensor-packed bandages that are capable of monitoring wounds could start happening within the next 12 months. Those sensors will be able to monitor the state of a wound and relay that information back to a doctor to help customize the treatment. All without having to make an appointment to actually see your doc. 5G wireless data will ensure that information about the patient wound is sent to the doctor in real-time.

With the information from the bandages, Doctors will be able to monitor a wound and recommend a treatment plan based on how well it is healing. Doctors will also be able to track how active the injured person is. Earlier researchers at the University of Bath carried out trials on a dressing that changes color to indicate whether a wound has been infected. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have also been working on bandages that can provide medicine to a wound to speed up the healing process.