Source: News Bharati English14 Jul 2017 14:45:35

Canberra, July 14: Australia plans to frame stringent laws to stop terrorists and criminals from communicating freely online. These new laws will involve internet giants such as Google and Facebook to hand over and decrypt messages from suspected terrorists and criminals. 

The Australian government said that it will introduce new laws to decrypt messages from suspected terrorists and criminals. Similar to Britain’s Investigatory Powers Act which requires companies to comply with investigations, the new laws are set to be introduced into Parliament when sitting resumes next month. 

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said that world leaders agreed at last week’s G20 meetings in Hamburg, Germany, that more needed to be done to stop terrorists and criminals from communicating freely online. Speaking at a media conference, Turnbull said Australia’s laws needed to apply “online as well as offline”. 

“We need to ensure that the Internet is not used as a dark place for bad people to hide their criminal activities from the law, and the AFP (Australian Federal Police) must have the powers, as do the other intelligence agencies to enforce the law online as well as offline,” Turnbull said. 

“Increasingly, communications across the net, whether it’s messaging or voice applications, are encrypted end-to-end. So while they can be intercepted, they cannot be read. We want to ensure the brilliant tech companies bring their brilliance to assist the rule of law. Not through ‘back doors’, but through legitimate ways so they can keep us safe,” he said. “These are vitally important reforms designed to keep Australians safe.”