Sweet smile with stressful responsibly can turn diabetic if ‘SHE’ won’t devote time for her wellbeing
Source :NewsBharati   Date :13-Mar-2019


Paris, March 13:
A new review featuring in the European Journal of Endocrinology suggests that a stressful work environment may increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in women. In India, Women pay more attention to the health of the men and children in the family, leaving them with less time to devote to their own wellbeing

Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include a lack of physical activity, being overweight or having obesity, being aged 45 years or older, having high cholesterol and high blood pressure, or having a family history of diabetes, heart disease, or stroke.

Psychological factors may also play a role in the development of type 2 diabetes. Living with depression may make the risk higher, and a new study now suggests that work-related stress may also increase the likelihood of developing the condition, at least for women.

Guy Fagherazzi, a senior research scientist at the Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health at the research institute Inserm in Paris, France, led the new study.

Over 9 percent of the U.S. population is living with diabetes, and more than 84 million people are living with prediabetes — a condition that is bound to develop into full-blown type 2 diabetes without treatment.

Diabetes is fast gaining the status of a potential epidemic in India with more than 62 million diabetic individuals currently diagnosed with the disease.

The aetiology of diabetes in India is multifactorial and includes genetic factors coupled with environmental influences such as obesity associated with rising living standards, steady urban migration, and lifestyle changes. Yet despite the incidence of diabetes within India, there are no nationwide and few multi-centric studies conducted on the prevalence of diabetes and its complications.

To reduce the disease burden that diabetes creates in India, appropriate government interventions and combined efforts from all the stakeholders of the society are required.

Clinicians may be targeted to facilitate the implementation of screening and early detection programmes, diabetes prevention, self-management counselling, and therapeutic management of diabetes in accordance with the appropriate local guidelines form the backbone of controlling the predicted diabetes epidemic.